Dietetics

Like What You See….?

…But could do without all the big words? Follow Samantha and The Nourished Soul on Instagram! All you have to do is click follow, and feast your eyes on the pretty pictures. No reading required.

Instagram username is @realfoodisthebest.

http://instagram.com/realfoodisthebest

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See ya there ;-).

Sitting with Uncertainty (and other things I’ve felt while living unemployed…)

Hello beauties!

A happy mid-June to you all. I hope the weather is beautiful where you are. If not, get a load of this:

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I’m as shocked as you are. This is San Francisco, for Pete’s sake.

Well, last I checked in, I had just completed the final rotation in my dietetic internship. Uncertainties abound, but the newness of being free from supervised practice hours for the rest of my career was enough to keep at bay the flaming ball of anxiety that often inhabits my gut.

Prior to completing my internship, I firmly proclaimed that I required some down time, during which I could focus on studying for my RD board exam, and with money I had saved, I could get myself through a few more months unemployed. After passing the exam, I would carry on with my job hunt, warp speed – factor 10.

Well, to my utter shock, as soon as I had about 3 weeks left of my internship, I awoke from a haze to find I had been frantically perusing nutrition job websites, and noticed fingers that looked like mine typing away at cover letters and requests for references. What. Is. Happening?!

I wish I could say I caught myself in this old behavior, realized I wasn’t giving myself the unstructured time I so wanted and deserved, closed my laptop, and refocused my energy on passing my exam while enjoying life around me. Alas, this was not the case.

A number of weeks into practicing my daily routine of wake up, coffee, procrastinate, job hunt, “organizing” (shuffling things around until piles look manageable), listening to 1/4 of an Inman RD exam review track, and back to “organizing”, I had a nice little epiphany at which I so peacefully arrived by having it slapped upon my face.

Through networking and good fortune, I was put into contact with several people who were offering jobs that looked promising. After phone conversations and/or email correspondence, these opportunities looked like potential hires. They were jobs that I would be completely happy exploring, and I thought it would take away the anxiety I have felt relating to the dreaded day I run out of money. Well, time and time again, after informal interviews went as perfectly as they could have, I was told I would be a great candidate for the position, but right now they were looking for someone who had already passed their exam.

Alright – what’s the big idea, Universe? I was told early on in my plight into dietetics that many companies are ok with hiring prior to passing your exam, with the expectation that you pass within a certain amount of time from hire date. But that was proving wrong over and over again.

And then I remembered… Isn’t this exactly what I asked for? Didn’t I say I wanted and needed time to focus on this exam, and getting my life together post-internship? And didn’t I predict how I would struggle to just sit back and ALLOW this to happen?

Hm… Seems like the Universe just might have my best interest in mind here.

So currently where I sit is here:
Going against the voice in my head that tells me I’m not good enough because I get to live life on my own schedule these days, I have put the job hunt on hold. I am mostly focused on studying for this exam, and on appreciating what else I have going on, from a blossoming social life in a fantastic, still relatively new city, to community involvement and being of service to others. I have ACTUALLY done some legitimate organization which looks like this — a calendar where I can view things both weekly and monthly, noting sections of my exam review to go over each day to keep me on track to be as prepared as possible come test day. My exam is scheduled for July 23, which gives me over a month from right now to prep. I’m sure this time will fly by, so I’m avoiding the mind set that I have plenty of time and can get it done when I feel like it, which has often plagued me in the past; however there is enough time between now and the test for me to not be so susceptible to full-fledged conniption-style panic attacks if I only get through 5 pages instead of my intended 6 on any given Tuesday (if you don’t believe this to be a possibility, you were fortunate enough not to know me circa 2012).

For those fellow RDs to be who are curious about how I am studying and what materials I am using, I am going through Inman’s Review of Dietetics, and listening to the CDs where she reviews each domain and notes specific important details. That’s all I’ll say for now, and hopefully I can return in about a month to tell you that what I did actually WORKED, and share more at that time.

Until then, I will be sitting in some discomfort, and remembering to refrain from complaining about receiving the things I’ve always asked for.

Keep smilin, lovelies. Our futures are lookin damn bright.

<3,
Samantha

Protect Your Heart: Diet, Exercise, and Weight Loss

Congestive Heart Failure. Myocardial Infarction. Hypertension.

These are a bunch of scary words for conditions that can arise when our diets lack balance. But if you’re here, you’ve already taken the first step toward prevention – you’re looking for an answer to the question “What can I do to keep myself healthy?” … So congratulate yourself!

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It looks tough and strong, but it really needs your help!

There are a lot of bits of information out there, telling us how to improve our diets. However, current evidence points to a few factors that dietetics and science believe to be true about decreasing risk for certain heart health related conditions. If you have been told by a physician that you have high blood pressure or hypertension, or that you are at risk for developing heart failure (or CHF) or of having a heart attack, you may find this information helpful.

 

1. Weight Loss

One of the most basic things you can do for yourself to decrease your risk for heart disease is making sure you achieve and maintain a healthy body weight. Here is a link to a BMI calculator – you can input your height and weight, and the calculator will tell you your Body Mass Index, or BMI. This number is what clinicians sometimes use as a way of assessing whether your weight is in a healthy range for your height. The goal is to have a BMI greater than 18.5, and less than 24.9. If your BMI is 25 or greater, this is classified as overweight. If your BMI is 30 or greater, this is considered obese. The higher your BMI clocks in above 25, the greater your risk for developing heart disease.

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The topic of weight loss is all around us, and everyone wants to know the answer for how to shed pounds. Well, I have the answer RIGHT HERE. It’s not a pill. It’s not a powder you add to your weight loss shake. It’s not a superfood, or a magic berry, or anything some mad scientist crafted in his underground layer. It’s three words: BALANCE. VARIETY. MODERATION.

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I know, it’s not that exciting right away. But think of it this way: you get to eat WHATEVER YOU WANT! Just utilize portion control, and try to vary your choices. Now it sounds kind of great, right?

The other thing you can focus on that will help with weight loss, and has been proven to benefit those at risk for heart disease is increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables. Not only are these low-calorie, high-fiber options (a perfect recipe for healthy weight loss), but the minerals in most of the foods in these two food groups have been shown to help reduce blood pressure.

And, of course, get up and MOVE! I know the term “exercise” can sound truly unappealing to many. But remember – as long as you’re moving, your body can’t tell whether you’re at the gym on a treadmill, walking around the mall, or putting away laundry in different areas of the house. The point is, if you get moving, your body will thank you. Remember that ANY type of movement can count as physical activity!

Some of my favorite ways to get moving:

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Yoga

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Walks

Stretching

Dancing!

So, maybe you don’t need to lose weight, but your doctor has told you you’re still at risk. So what else can you do to protect yourself, and make sure you’re around for all the exciting things in the futures of you and your loved ones? Keep reading…

2. Reduce Sodium

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Sodium is a tricky bugger. You have probably heard it said before – it is in EVERYTHING. If you pick up any processed food product (basically anything in a package), the chances are high that on the nutrition label, next to “Sodium,” you will see a number of at least 150 mg, but often much more than that. Some prepared meals have over 1000 mg, which delivers almost 100% of what many of us need in a whole day in just one meal. The best way to cut back on sodium, and to promote not only weight loss but overall good health as well, is to stick to a diet made up of mostly whole foods. What I mean by whole foods is this: the next time you’re at the grocery store, walk around the perimeter first. See if you can stock up on only foods like fruits, veggies, lean meats, and whole grains. By avoiding the center aisles, you’ll avoid foods like chips, cookies, candy, frozen treats, and even the sneaky items like crackers and some cereals and bread products. Another scary carrier of major sodium is canned foods. Soups and canned vegetables can have a very large amount of sodium per serving. If canned soups are a big part of your current diet, try keeping it to 1 per day, and maybe choosing a reduced sodium version. In terms of vegetables, fresh or frozen is best, but if you must get canned, rinse them before eating or cooking – it will remove a significant amount of sodium!

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Aiming for a colorful diet is a great way to ensure nutritional variety!

Here is a map of a standard grocery store layout. See how all the fresh food is on the perimeter, with most of the processed items in the center aisles?

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Another thing you can try is not adding salt to food when cooking at home, and not adding salt to meals after they are prepared, either at home or when eating out. Additionally, eating at home almost always provides you with less sodium, and better overall nutrition than eating out does. If you’re feeling like your food is bland without salt, try some salt alternatives like Mrs. Dash, or experiment with different salt-free seasonings and herbs.

mrs-dashJust a few of your options…

But be careful of salt substitutes like NuSalt that are made up mostly of the nutrient Potassium. Our bodies need this nutrient, but too much of it can cause heart attacks. So check with your doctor before trying it!

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Some examples of potassium-containing salt subs – remember, ASK YOUR DOC!

3. Balance your diet to reduce high fat items

So we really are passed the low fat diet craze that bummed many people out through the 80s and 90s. But there is some merit in watching the fat you consume! The thing to remember is to keep it balanced. Enjoy whole foods, and try to enjoy healthy fat sources. These can include avocado, olive oil (and olives), wild fish, and nuts. Just remember – fat contributes a lot of calories per gram, so even when eating healthy fats, limit portions so as not to overshoot your calories for the day.

Sources of saturated fats—the ones you should eat in moderation (even more so than the healthy ones)—include butter, vegetable oils (particularly when used to deep fry), and high-fat meats (like rib eye steaks, bacon, etc). A good rule of thumb: if a fat is solid at room temperature, like butter, it’s likely a saturated fat, and in excess, may lead to heart disease.

4. Heart Failure Information

If your doctor has told you that you are at risk for congestive heart failure, or CHF, you may really benefit from observing the recommendations above. Another thing to remember is to monitor your weight, even if you are not trying to lose. This is important because, if you go into heart failure, your body begins to retain fluid. If you are at risk, try to weigh yourself daily. If your weight goes up 1-2 lbs in 1 day, or 5 lbs in 1 week, contact your doctor immediately, as this could indicate heart failure.

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The best thing you can do for your health is to try to implement one healthy habit today. So, what will you do? Eat an extra serving of fruit or veggies? Maybe go for a walk? Or decide on a lower sodium alternative to something high in salt you normally eat?

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Yumm, right?!

I would love to hear how you’re implementing these changes to improve your health and quality of life, and to keep you on this Earth a little (or a LOT) longer.

What will you change today?!

Diabetes Awareness Month!

It’s Novemeber! And this month is about more than just who can grow the sickest mustache for Prostate Cancer Awareness… It’s also Diabetes Awareness Month!!

Inspired by this video, I decided to come back at ya’ll with my first video in about 6 months to discuss a truly important topic. In this week’s (or month’s… season’s…) video, I’ve discussed the basics of both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes — the two major types–with some information about disease prevention and management through diet and lifestyle.

If you already have diabetes, or are/may be pre-diabetic, speak with your healthcare team about the best course of action for you, and about proper diet plans in addition to medications and/or insulin.

Please contact me at thenourishedsoulblog@gmail.com with ANY questions, or leave a comment below!

Now go move!

P.S. I am a bit more “glow-y” in today’s video than usual. Darn bay windows… Please bare with it! Or hide my face… it doesn’t matter. Just listen! Enjoy.

Build a Better Burger: National Cheeseburger Day!

WHAT? Today is NATIONAL CHEESEBURGER DAY?! Sweet. Well, I think in honor of this grand event, I’ll talk a little bit about how to eat a SMARTER BURGER. Below, a few tips.

1.Enjoy yourself!

I am here, as a soon-to-be dietitian, advocating that it is not only OK to eat a burger from time to time—I’m in fact letting you know that there are actually BENEFITS to red meat. It is true that you can get the iron, vitamin B12, and protein for which red meat is so famed from other sources. So if you do not prefer red meat, you CAN save yourself from deficiency. Keep an eye on my Nutrient Spotlight page for updates on that. However, if you are a fan of beef, it is an extremely bioavailable source of iron—meaning your body absorbs it more easily than it does from other sources (e.g. leafy greens). And iron-deficiency anemia happens to be the most common and widespread nutrient deficiency worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. So don’t pour on the guilt—congratulate yourself for making a good choice that will provide your body with a ton of nutrients

2. Go Grass-Fed and Local

There is a fair amount of controversy surrounding the meat industry, and it’s often difficult to decipher what to avoid, and what is mainly hype. A safe bet is to choose local meats as much as possible, and look for organic grass-fed beef. This will ensure that the cows destined to be your burger were fed a diet that their gut could understand and break down properly, and that the animals weren’t treated with hormones or anything not naturally occurring in the animal already.

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Happy cows come from….

3. Dress It Up Right

Many foods become demonized, thwarting high levels of not-so-good-for-us nutrients, and are forced to wear the diet-version of a “Scarlet Letter.” However, sometimes it’s not the food itself that has so many adverse effects as much as what goes with the food. Moderate amounts of ketchup and mustard (think: 1 Tablespoon) are great additions to a burger. But to get more nutrient bang for you calorie buck, try taking out high saturated fat condiments like mayonnaise to be replaced with avocado. It will introduce an interesting new texture to your burger, as well as some serious creamy goodness! And avocados provide healthy fats that are required for every day bodily functions, and can help prevent heart disease and inflammation, in addition to cancer-fighting antioxidants. Avos can also have a fab effect on hair, skin, and nails. It should be mentioned, however, that due to this super food’s high fat content (although it’s the GOOD KIND), avocados are high in calories, and should still be consumed in moderation.

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Those are some delicious looking antioxidants.

ALSO—pile on as many veggies as you can! No reason to stop at the standard lettuce-onion-tomato. Through some peppers on your grill, and stack them on your burger. The hot ones have major metabolic benefits. Any non-starchy veg would probably go great on a burger—experiment! And let me know what works and what doesn’t!

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One more note (as it is nat’l CHEESEburger day)… Cheese is a great source of calcium, and provides protein as well. I will admit to being an absolute cheese lover. But it’s a food to moderate, as it typically contains high amounts of saturated fat and sodium. Some cheeses are available in part-skim versions–go for those whenever possible. Or just enjoy a smaller amount of a full fat version. Either way–ENJOYMENT is very important!

4. Choose Your Bun Wisely

Not only can you pack an extra serving of veggies into your burger, but you can even utilize this meal as a chance to squeeze in an extra serving of whole grains. When at the store, all the choices we’re given in which to wrap our patties can certainly overwhelm a person. The simplest rule for choosing whole grains is this: the VERY FIRST INGREDIENT should read: WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR. If it doesn’t, it’s not a true whole grain.

Examples:

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^Not a whole grain (the first ingredient is ENRICHED FLOUR)*

*I know this is a confusing topic. Please feel free to email me (samfink14@gmail.com) or comment with any questions.

If you’re not a bread lover, you can even wrap your burger in a lettuce wrap. I’d recommend choosing darker romaine leaves over iceberg—the darker your veggie leaves, the more nutrients they contain. But don’t be afraid of a few carbs—they can provide much-needed fiber, as most of us don’t get what we need from our diets.

If you’re trying to avoid red meat, or prefer a more plant-based diet, you can always go for a veggie burger! Just make sure you’re not replacing a beef burger with something that’s highly processed, because health-wise you are doing yourself no favors with that choice. Your best bet may be to make one at home using whole ingredients. Here’s a recipe for one that uses LENTILS (a great plant source of protein)! You may also see beans used, and any other starchy protein. I actually was recently at a restaurant that served a veggie burger made of quinoa and beets! If you prefer to purchase a packaged version, check the ingredients list, and choose one with a short list of ingredients, and words you can pronounce. Watch the sodium level on these items as well.

And remember–as with all things–moderation is key. A burger every once in a while can provide you with major benefits. But one every day may result in lethargy, fluid retention, high cholesterol, and weight gain. So have a happy National Cheeseburger Day! And enjoy yourself!!

Nice Melons!

…Thanks, they’re local.

 

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Just picked up a mini watermelon from my local produce market. Upon arriving home, I found this sticker on it:

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Melon Up! allows you to enter your fruit’s assigned serial number, and see where exactly your snack was grown, thereby being able to gauge how far it traveled to get to you.

And according to this map taken directly from the website, these services are available in a number of locations across the United States, Mexico, and Central America! Hooray!

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Thank you, Melon Up! for making eating local even more feasible.

Enjoy your weekend!

Coffee Drinking Associated with Lower Suicide Rates in Some

Coffee Drinking Associated with Lower Suicide Rates in Some

I now feel absolutely NO reason to defend my coffee drinking to anyone! Drink up, coffee fiends. Happy Saturday!

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