healthy

What Is Normal Eating?

If you’ve ever wondered what the heck constitutes “normal eating”, check out the post I wrote for the Head to Toe Wellness Blog:

http://headtotoewellness.weebly.com/mind-and-body/what-is-normal-eating

We may not know what “normal” even means. But it definitely doesn’t mean perfect! Normal eating is a mix of habits, and a whole lot of self-compassion. Read on, and please leave any questions or thoughts you have hear or on Head to Toe!

Love yourself,

Samantha ❤

Like What You See….?

…But could do without all the big words? Follow Samantha and The Nourished Soul on Instagram! All you have to do is click follow, and feast your eyes on the pretty pictures. No reading required.

Instagram username is @realfoodisthebest.

http://instagram.com/realfoodisthebest

IMG_8514

See ya there ;-).

Sitting with Uncertainty (and other things I’ve felt while living unemployed…)

Hello beauties!

A happy mid-June to you all. I hope the weather is beautiful where you are. If not, get a load of this:

20140618-122155-44515310.jpg

20140618-122155-44515566.jpg

I’m as shocked as you are. This is San Francisco, for Pete’s sake.

Well, last I checked in, I had just completed the final rotation in my dietetic internship. Uncertainties abound, but the newness of being free from supervised practice hours for the rest of my career was enough to keep at bay the flaming ball of anxiety that often inhabits my gut.

Prior to completing my internship, I firmly proclaimed that I required some down time, during which I could focus on studying for my RD board exam, and with money I had saved, I could get myself through a few more months unemployed. After passing the exam, I would carry on with my job hunt, warp speed – factor 10.

Well, to my utter shock, as soon as I had about 3 weeks left of my internship, I awoke from a haze to find I had been frantically perusing nutrition job websites, and noticed fingers that looked like mine typing away at cover letters and requests for references. What. Is. Happening?!

I wish I could say I caught myself in this old behavior, realized I wasn’t giving myself the unstructured time I so wanted and deserved, closed my laptop, and refocused my energy on passing my exam while enjoying life around me. Alas, this was not the case.

A number of weeks into practicing my daily routine of wake up, coffee, procrastinate, job hunt, “organizing” (shuffling things around until piles look manageable), listening to 1/4 of an Inman RD exam review track, and back to “organizing”, I had a nice little epiphany at which I so peacefully arrived by having it slapped upon my face.

Through networking and good fortune, I was put into contact with several people who were offering jobs that looked promising. After phone conversations and/or email correspondence, these opportunities looked like potential hires. They were jobs that I would be completely happy exploring, and I thought it would take away the anxiety I have felt relating to the dreaded day I run out of money. Well, time and time again, after informal interviews went as perfectly as they could have, I was told I would be a great candidate for the position, but right now they were looking for someone who had already passed their exam.

Alright – what’s the big idea, Universe? I was told early on in my plight into dietetics that many companies are ok with hiring prior to passing your exam, with the expectation that you pass within a certain amount of time from hire date. But that was proving wrong over and over again.

And then I remembered… Isn’t this exactly what I asked for? Didn’t I say I wanted and needed time to focus on this exam, and getting my life together post-internship? And didn’t I predict how I would struggle to just sit back and ALLOW this to happen?

Hm… Seems like the Universe just might have my best interest in mind here.

So currently where I sit is here:
Going against the voice in my head that tells me I’m not good enough because I get to live life on my own schedule these days, I have put the job hunt on hold. I am mostly focused on studying for this exam, and on appreciating what else I have going on, from a blossoming social life in a fantastic, still relatively new city, to community involvement and being of service to others. I have ACTUALLY done some legitimate organization which looks like this — a calendar where I can view things both weekly and monthly, noting sections of my exam review to go over each day to keep me on track to be as prepared as possible come test day. My exam is scheduled for July 23, which gives me over a month from right now to prep. I’m sure this time will fly by, so I’m avoiding the mind set that I have plenty of time and can get it done when I feel like it, which has often plagued me in the past; however there is enough time between now and the test for me to not be so susceptible to full-fledged conniption-style panic attacks if I only get through 5 pages instead of my intended 6 on any given Tuesday (if you don’t believe this to be a possibility, you were fortunate enough not to know me circa 2012).

For those fellow RDs to be who are curious about how I am studying and what materials I am using, I am going through Inman’s Review of Dietetics, and listening to the CDs where she reviews each domain and notes specific important details. That’s all I’ll say for now, and hopefully I can return in about a month to tell you that what I did actually WORKED, and share more at that time.

Until then, I will be sitting in some discomfort, and remembering to refrain from complaining about receiving the things I’ve always asked for.

Keep smilin, lovelies. Our futures are lookin damn bright.

<3,
Samantha

Weeks 29 – 36: The FINAL 8 in School Nutrition Management

Well, it’s been a long road, but I can finally say with pride rivaled only by exhaustion that I have COMPLETED my dietetic internship!

Snl-so-freakin-excited

School nutrition management was my final rotation, and it was an experience unlike most of the others. Something I enjoyed was getting to work with a team of managers who worked in non-nutrition disciplines. For most of my 8 weeks, I spent time with our Food Service Director, a Manager in Training, our Associate Director, and worked closely with our head chef and catering manager as well. My rotation took place at San Francisco State University.  As I may have explained in previous posts, my internship was completed (love putting that in the PAST TENSE!) through Morrison Chartwells, a subset of Compass Group. Compass Group has a multitude of sectors, which provide food and nutrition services to establishments from hospitals, to schools, to business and industry settings. Morrison is the sector of Compass that serves healthcare establishments, which is where I did my clinical rotations. Chartwells is the sector that serves schools (and Chartwells Higher Ed, to further categorize, serves college campuses). My experience was unique in that I was working with Chartwells Higher Education, which works on college campuses – most other interns in my program were rotating in K-12 Chartwells accounts.

 

CompassGroupLogo2009

 

Now that that’s out of the way….

 

My school nutrition rotation taught me a lot about management, and working with a team in which you are often the sole nutrition representative. I did have the opportunity to work with the Regional RD, Laura, who oversees Chartwells Higher Ed accounts. However, this was a long distance relationship, and  Laura did not have a scheduled trip out to SFSU during my time there. She was always available by phone and email, and was a large part of my learning experience in this rotation. Not having an RD present at the site on a daily basis taught me many times over to be proactive and independent.

Chartwells at SFSU incorporates a concept called Balanced Kitchen, which I was so excited to be a part of. Balanced Kitchen focuses on wellness on college campuses. At one point, I conducted an audit to ensure the dining center was meeting the wellness criteria for this concept – and our SF State champs did very well! I remember being a freshman in college, and staying well with healthy foods was such a challenge. It is great to see higher education moving in a direction that promotes the importance of a healthy lifestyle.

 

Balanced U_online_3

Some of the criteria for Balanced Kitchen (aka Balanced U), and what the dining center strives to promote.

 

This was a project-centered rotation. In these 8 weeks, I think I completed upwards of 10 projects – and all of them took some serious time commitment! Some highlights:

 National Nutrition Month Activities:

48056_10101265157650785_569107136_n

Me, beaming in the presence of my food models. Typical.

 

Nutrition Educations:

Processed with VSCOcam with g3 preset

Weird shadow on my face… But here I am giving a lesson on eating local and seasonally. My favorite educational tool right now is my local foods wheel. Ask me where you can find one!

 

Participation in Sustainability and Real Food Events:

IMG_7791

IMG_7792

IMG_7790 A real local food-focused event!

IMG_8119

Put on a Farmer’s Market

Processed with VSCOcam with g3 preset

Enjoyed soo much delicious local produce.

 

Stress Reduction Fair:

IMG_8011

Focused on how to use good nutrition to keep stress in check! So much fun talking to students – and I met someone I’ve communicated with in the blog world! Amazing.

 

and Staff Trainings, and Food Service & Sanitation Audits (not pictured, because not that exciting – bein’ honest, folks).

 

 ***

 

By the end of my rotation, I had made some strong connections with Compass employees at SF State, and I feel this rotation was the best opportunity to get to know some of the higher-ups who work for corporate! Getting to know some of the big wigs who manage entire regions was not only inspiring, but also allowed me to make an impression, shake some hands, and learn more about Compass as a whole.

 

As this blog is about honesty, I don’t want to leave out how much I struggled to get through this last rotation. With 8 weeks standing between me and RD eligibility, the to do list seemed forever impending. It’s not that the rotation was extremely challenging – I have been SO grateful to be done with clinical, and the stress level was NOT THE SAME here. But I did feel often paralyzed when I looked down at the list of projects to complete, and it even took me a few weeks to get started on some. But as of posting this, my assignments are COMPLETE, and I am awaiting the OK to sign up for my RD board exam (eeek!). This is a good reminder for me that it will all get done if I work toward it, but I have to remember to stay calm, get focused and organized, and just keep moving forward.

 

Well, folks, that wraps it up! Thank you to everyone who continued reading through my experience! I hope I was able to shed some light on the experience of dietetic internships for those of you embarking on this path. If you have questions, or just want to let me know how I’m doing (or how YOU are doing), please drop me a line below, or shoot an email over to thenourishedsoulblog@gmail.com.

 

This may be the end of my 1240+ supervised practice hours, but don’t you worry – there is still plenty of living, studying, and trying not to have panic attacks that I’ll be continuing to write about. Stay tuned, beautiful people! The best is yet to come over here.<3

IMG_7343

Lessons in Tree Pose

Lessons in Tree Pose

Something I learned in Tree Pose this week: if you take the time you need getting there, ya might stay longer. Applicable, no?

Speaking of taking our time, please expect a new post on how my dietetic internship ended up with my School Nutrition Management rotation, and take a peak into the uncertainty and excitement that comes with the life of an internship grad as I job hunt and study for my RD exam! Hope you lovely readers are having a beautiful day. Stay grounded ;-).

❤ Samantha

Amy Poehler on Loving Your Body

LessonsFromAmy6

Photo borrowed from: inspiredbycharm.com

http://www.upworthy.com/yo-oprah-imma-let-you-finish-but-amy-poehler-has-the-best-body-image-advice-of-a?c=ufb2

I didn’t think I could admire this woman of comedy any more than I already did. But there she goes spreading wisdom, reminding me once again how to be kind to myself. All you beautiful beings who who tend to easily forget what perfectly imperfect beings you truly are (*guilty!*) will benefit from hearing this. Click the link and remember to be gentle.

Peace and Self-Love.
❤ Samantha

Weeks 23-28: Long Term Care and Community Nutrition

 

 

Every time I realize my clinical rotation is completely behind me, I feel completely shocked. Clinical rotations were something I had been anticipating since I came to understand what exactly happens in a dietetic internship. I am so excited to be moving down this path so quickly, and can’t believe the speed at which it’s flying by.

 

Immediately after my clinical rotations, I began the next two weeks in long term care, at a place called St. Paul’s Towers in Oakland, California.

 

Long Term Care: St. Paul’s Tower’s, Oakland, CA

long term care facility, dietetic internship long term care rotation

Older picture, but it’s still this HUGE!

 

St. Paul’s Towers is what is referred to as a Continuing Care Retirement Community, or a CCRC. By definition, CCRCs offer living facilities across all levels of care, which include independent living, assisted living, and skilled nursing (aka SNF). Here is a link to a basic description of each level of care: Long Term Levels of Care.

One of the jobs I worked before starting my dietetic internship was as the Dietary Director of a skilled nursing facility. With this under my belt, I felt I had already gained a fair amount of exposure to the job of a dietitian in a long term care facility. As it turns out, I was correct, but of course had volumes more to learn.

Fortunately for me, St. Paul’s happened to be going into mock survey during my first week there. Mock survey is something that, to those with a bit of knowledge of regulations in skilled nursing, sounds very scary, but is actually a positive thing. To start, I will explain the dreaded SURVEY. Every skilled facility has a survey “window” – for example, the SNF that I worked at had a survey window from April through July, if I recall correctly. What this window means is that any time during these months, surveyors who are usually sent from the state or federal level can show up at a facility and will audit everything from nursing to medical records to dietary and nutrition, looking for any errors  — anything at all you’ve done incorrectly or inadequately over the last year. So, survey itself is definitely SCARY. But MOCK survey is a company’s way of preparing for the true surveyors. During mock survey, the overarching company that runs the facility will send their own representative to audit all of these areas, and act exactly as a surveyor would. It is still terrifying, as each department (very much including nutrition) is looked at on such a microscopic level, that you can basically expect that any mistake you made over the last year will be found, addressed, and acted upon to correct. But, while this induces every self-critical voice in a young dietitian’s mind, mock survey is a good thing, as it is not put in place to get everyone in trouble, but to catch mistakes and assign them a plan of correction before the actual survey happens. Because the thing about a true survey is that if they catch too many mistakes, or just a small number of mistakes that show to cause harm to a large number of residents, the facility can have major penalties, and even be shut down completely.

 

So, it was great to have exposure to this process. When I was at my SNF about a year ago, I never had the… pleasure… of undergoing survey – but we were all constantly on edge, prepping for them to walk through the doors at any moment, so I was familiar with how to prepare for a survey. But getting this additional opportunity to hear everything from the preparation phase through the exit conference where the mock surveyor shares all of her findings with us was very beneficial.

 

A large portion of the week was spent shadowing and observing, but I also got a ton of hands on experience doing kitchen audits, dining room observations, and clinical assessments. My favorite part of my 2 weeks here was how creative my preceptor liked to get to bring a little extra joy to her residents. Mondays she took a little time to make hot chocolate and deliver a cup to any resident who was interested. One day per week she also would deliver fresh baked cookies to each resident. All of these practices that the RD implemented were a great way to add a little excitement to each week, boosted morale for employees (who got sweeties too!) and also acted as a great method for sneaking in some extra calories for those residents experiencing difficulty with weight maintenance!

 

Overall, my Long Term Care rotation was a great experience, and allowed for some unexpected new exposure. Next up was Community Nutrition at WIC!

 

Community Nutrition: WIC (Women, Infants, and Children)

The day after LTC was completed, I jumped in my lil’ Kia Sportage, and enjoyed a solo roadtrip down the California coast to spend the next 3 weeks at Normandie WIC near downtown Los Angeles. WIC is a supplemental nutrition program that serves low income families, assisting with food and providing nutrition education and counseling. The program serves pregnant mommies-to-be, and continues to assist as long as the family remains eligible until the child is 5 years old. Additionally, if the mother miscarries, services are still available up to 6 months after end of pregnancy. Different food packages are provided to these families, a picture of which is below (my WIC rotation was done in California – this is a picture of Florida WIC’s food packages, but they are similar):

 

khfakdjf

Supplemental Food Breakdown

 WIC will provide supplemental nutrition for the mother while she is pregnant, and will continue to do so after her pregnancy if she is breastfeeding. As the image above indicates, food packages vary based on whether the mother reports she is completely breastfeeding, mostly breastfeeding, or only providing some breast milk, or none at all.

 

WIC provides special WIC checks which can be used at participating stores for to obtain these foods. Participants can tell if a store will accept their WIC checks by looking for this image:

 

wic_logo 

 

 

During this rotation I learned so much more about the challenges that come with breastfeeding your child – although at the same time, I was reminded of all the incredible benefits both mother and baby receive when breastfeeding is made a part of the child’s first year. I was so happy to be reminded of the preventative benefits of breastfeeding, like decreasing disease risk and risk of obesity and cancer for both mother and the baby. Additionally, the emotional bonding that occurs between mom and child from skin-to-skin contact is truly amazing. And, of course, the nerdy nutrition girl that I am, I would be remiss not to mention the nutritional benefits of breastfeeding right away. WARNING: If you do NOT wish to get nerdy with me, please skip ahead to the next paragraph. Hello? Anyone left? Awesome, I knew I could count on you… So, later on in pregnancy, the mother’s body does begin to produce breast milk. However, the milk at this stage is what is referred to as colostrum – it is a substance that is a bit more yellow in color, and is made up of mostly protein. When you feed your baby right away with this early breast milk, they tend to see an array of benefits. Also, it just so happens that the nutritional makeup of colostrum is just EXACTLY what the infant needs at that early stage of life – now it’s pretty hard to dispute nature in all her perfection, am I right?

 

Now, if you’re just joining us, let me assure you of what a fun time we had in science land…

 

During this rotation, I was required to be very proactive in making sure I got the experience I needed/wanted. It was difficult to gain hands-on experience with counseling and educations due to a few limitations. Firstly, I did not have access to the computer charting system, since I was only at this site for 3 weeks. The computer was pretty imperative in conducting a counseling session, so most of what I did was observation, while providing input when it came time to conducting educations. The second and very significant challenge and limiting factor here was the language barrier. With only 3 years of high school Spanish under my belt, I knew I would not be able to have intellectual conversations about nutrition, nor convey all the information and passion I normally feel capable of communicating. I had been warned that when working at WIC, it is HIGHLY beneficial to be bilingual (at the very least), but I must have underestimated just how beneficial. It took me a few DAYS to be able to even observe anything because everything was being conducted in Spanish, Armenian, Russian, or Korean (and then some…). It was only later in my rotation that I mustered the confidence to decide that I could at least observe in Spanish, at which point I learned that I had a basic enough understanding of the language to at least follow along (although I was correct in feeling I could not communicate on my own…).

 

Given these significant limitations, a lot of the benefits that came from this rotation came in the form of projects that I asked my preceptor to be a part of. I requested to be given assignments, like creating handouts, which I could work on during the day as I was waiting for a counseling or education class in a language I could understand. During the course of my 3 weeks, one handout I created deals with what is safe to eat during pregnancy.

I also got to work on a presentation that I gave to the staff on my last day on a topic of their choosing. The staff requested dietary carbohydrates, weight loss, and calories in food – so I chose to address carbohydrates, and encompass the other two within.

A link to both of the projects is availabe on my online portfolio (click it, click it!!!).

My WIC rotation was a nice break from the hustle that was my clinical rotations. And I so enjoyed my time in Los Angeles, where I got to experience being a nutrition professional in my hometown, and got to spend three whole weeks with family and old friends.

 

Reminder from Mom...

Reminder from Mom…

Surviving 3 weeks of LA traffic, and remembering to BREATHE

Surviving 3 weeks of LA traffic, and remembering to BREATHE

Spending time with some of my oldest friends...

Spending time with some of my oldest friends…

...and the best family.

…and the best family.

And takin' in all the beauty.

And takin’ in all the beauty.

After WIC, it’s hard to believe, but I’m on to my next and FINAL rotation: School Nutrition Management. With about three weeks left at this point, you can expect the summary of that rotation shortly.

 

And a QUICK NOTE to those of you who went through the dreaded DICAS match these past few months: if you matched, CONGRATULATIONS! It’s an incredible accomplishment, and you have many challenges and some incredible learning experiences ahead of you.

 

If you didn’t match, just remember how AMAZING you are. As a reminder, I did not match my first time applying either. And as it turns out, not matching put me exactly where I need to be in my life in so many ways. If you’re lookin’ for a pick me up, check out this post I wrote the night before my first, unsuccesful match, and reposted a year later. And if you just need to remember that the world is good, please view this Buzzfeed post on baby elephants learning to use their trunks — I promise it will at least make you smile.

 

Thanks for tuning in, everyone. And stay tuned for my next and FINAL post as a dietetic intern!

 

Love Yo’self.